Westlaw Journals weekly round-up

November 12, 2014

Westlaw Journals Weekly RoundupSome highlights from the past week’s litigation news headlines over at the Westlaw Journals blog include a patient suing over published photos of her injuries after a suicide attempt; Milk producers ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review antitrust class action; Airplane cleaning workers seek better protection from Ebola; and Mexico sues over excessive device costs stemming from Orthofix bribery scheme:

Patient sues hospital over published photos of her injuries after suicide attempt: A nurse at USC Medical Center took an unauthorized photograph of a patient who had attempted suicide by thrusting pencils in her eyes and shared the photo with third parties who posted it online, the patient has alleged in a California state court lawsuit. In an Oct. 30 complaint, “Jane Doe” and her conservator David Bliss claim the public hospital and Los Angeles County are liable for the unauthorized disclosure of her medical information, breach of confidentiality and emotional distress. (Medical Malpractice)

Got circuit split? Milk producers ask high court to review antitrust case: A federal appeals court wrongly decided that the plaintiffs in a class-action antitrust suit against milk processors and bottlers could survive summary judgment without producing evidence that the defendants’ conduct caused them injury, the defendants have told the U.S. Supreme Court. In a reply brief filed Oct. 14, Dean Foods Co., Dairy Farmers of America Inc. and National Dairy Holdings LP argue that a plaintiff must provide evidence of causation between an alleged conspiracy and injury to defeat a motion for summary judgment. (Antitrust)

Airplane cleaning workers seek better protection from Ebola: Airport employees in charge of cleaning planes say current working conditions put them at risk for Ebola. Cabin cleaners at airports in Philadelphia and New York recently spoke out for better safety equipment and training to help protect them from Ebola and other infectious diseases that travelers may carry during flights. (Aviation)

Mexico sues over excessive device costs stemming from Orthofix bribery scheme: A Mexican government agency is suing Orthofix International for fraud and racketeering, alleging the company made “obscene profits” by bribing Mexican health officials to boost its medical device sales there. Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, the agency that administers the country’s Social Security program and provides medical care to most Mexican citizens, says in an Oct. 3 federal court complaint that between 2003 and 2007, Orthofix maintained a scheme to pay cash bribes to the purchasing officials at two major hospitals. (Medical Devices)