Today in 1789: The first session of the First Congress ends

Sep 29, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On September 29, 1789, the first session of the First U.S. Congress ended, with some momentous achievements including the Judiciary Act of 1789.

Today in 1920: The Nineteenth Amendment is ratified

Aug 18, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment achieved ratification with the approval of the amendment by the Tennessee House of Representatives

Today in 1977: The Department of Energy is created

Aug 4, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

The Department of Energy was created by the Department of Energy Organization Act, which was signed into law by President Jimmy Carter on August 4, 1977.

Today in 1868: The Fourteenth Amendment is ratified

Jul 28, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On July 28, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment, one of the most significant constitutional amendments in existence, was ratified.

Today in 2010: Dodd-Frank is signed into law

Jul 21, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

The Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act – more commonly referred to as the Dodd-Frank Act – was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010.

Today in 1986: SCOTUS limits student free speech

Jul 7, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On July 7, 1986, the Supreme Court limited the constitutional freedom of speech protections afforded to students in its Bethel School District v. Fraser ruling.

Today in 1986: Bowers v. Hardwick is decided

Jun 30, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On June 30, 1986, the Supreme Court decided Bowers v. Hardwick, which upheld Georgia’s criminal statute banning homosexual sodomy.

Today in 2005: SCOTUS decides Kelo v. City of New London

Jun 23, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On June 23, 2005, the Supreme Court decided Kelo v. City of New London, causing massive backlash among the public for allowing the government taking of private property for private interests.

Today in 1980: The Supreme Court allows the first patent of a genetically-modified organism

Jun 16, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On June 16, 1980, the Supreme Court ruled in Diamond v. Chakrabarty that genetically-modified organisms are patentable, allowing for today’s widespread GMO use.

Today in 1952: SCOTUS invalidates President Truman’s seizure of steel mills

Jun 2, 2016 By: Jeremy Byellin

On June 2, 1952, the Supreme Court held in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer that President Truman’s seizure of the nation’s steel mills exceed his constitutional authority.

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