Commentary and analysis of current events that have legal implications.  We often pick up stories from Reuters news sources, or there may be a new court filing on Westlaw that catches our attention.

Westlaw Journals weekly round-up

Feb 27, 2013 By: Melissa Sachs

The new Westlaw Journals blog brings you litigation headlines in over 30 substantive areas of law.  Here are some highlights from the past week:

Hot Docs: SCOTUS to decide whether Fifth Amendment protects against testimony by court-ordered psychiatrist

Feb 27, 2013 By: Jeremy Byellin

The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case that will decide whether the Fifth Amendment protects against the state’s use of testimony from a court-ordered psychiatrist that evaluated the defendant.

Disasters in decision, paying the other party’s attorney’s fees

Feb 26, 2013 By: Dennis Wall and John K. DiMugno

A recent court ruling awarded to a homeowner almost three times what was owed by his insurance company. Not all disasters covered by insurers are acts of nature.

Colorado Jurors Award $7.2M for Injuries to Plaintiff’s Lungs, Respiratory System From Popcorn’s Butter Flavoring

Feb 26, 2013 By: Jury Verdicts

 Watson v. Dillon Companies Inc. d/b/a King Soopers and Inter-American-Products Inc.; The Kroger Co. d/b/a King Soopers, Dillon Companies Inc. and Inter-American-Products Inc.; Gilster-Mary

Lawsuit: Parents claim yoga in gym class promotes Hinduism

Feb 25, 2013 By: Jeremy Byellin

A group of parents recently filed a lawsuit against a California school district claiming that the district’s implementation of a yoga curriculum strongly promotes Hinduism.

The Contraceptive Coverage Mandate and the “War on Religion” – Part III

Feb 21, 2013 By: John K. DiMugno and Dennis Wall

As the litigation over the individual mandate drew to a close, a new wave of lawsuits emerged challenging the ACA’s preventive care mandate (a.k.a. the contraception mandate).

Hot Docs: SCOTUS relaxes requirements on police dog searches

Feb 21, 2013 By: Jeremy Byellin

The Supreme Court recently ruled in Florida v. Harris, which held that a drug-sniffing dog’s reliability is not subject to the strict standards imposed by the lower court.

Westlaw Journals weekly round-up

Feb 20, 2013 By: Melissa Sachs

The new Westlaw Journals blog brings you litigation headlines in over 30 substantive areas of law.  Here are some highlights from the past week:

What has changed since 2003 to make race-conscious admissions policies unconstitutional?

Feb 20, 2013 By: Jeremy Byellin

It’s only been ten years since Grutter v. Bollinger, but the Supreme Court seems poised to do away with the ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas. What’s changed?

FantasySCOTUS prediction: Will SCOTUS allow forcible blood sampling by law enforcement?

Feb 19, 2013 By: Jeremy Byellin

The Supreme Court is set to rule on Missouri v. McNeely, which could change the conditions under which it is constitutional for law enforcement to extract blood samples without the subject’s consent.